Category Archives: Technology

Motion Control – Pegasus Linear Bearings – For the Time A Linear Bearing Simply Cannot Fail!

Motion Control – Hybrid Ceramic Ball Linear Bearings

For those times when a Linear Bearing “CANNOT” Fail!

motion control - linear bearings


motion control - linear motion products

 

 

E. Longmeadow, MA –Motion Control – LM76 has developed the most corrosion resistant linear bearing available. In space, deep under the sea, or in the harshest environments, when there can be no “Plan B,” Pegasus Series 1 Linear Ball Bearings can be counted on to perform. In some applications linear bearings will not move for days, weeks, months or even years, however, when called on to perform they must work as if they just came out of the box. LM76’s Pegasus Series 1 Linear Bearings feature Silicon Nitride (SiNi) Ceramic Balls in a shell with retainer and end caps all made from 440 Stainless Steel and then ArmorloyTM coated.

Motion Control – The World’s Most Precise Six-axis Robot by Mecademic!

Motion Control –  Six-axis Robot!

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motion control - electromate robotics

 

 

 

Vaughan, Ontario, Canada — Motion Control Components — Mecademic is a Canadian robotics manufacturer that builds the world’s smallest, most precise, and easy-to-use industrial robotic arm, the Meca500. The Meca500 robot excels in the precise and repetitive manipulation of small parts and tools in a variety of industries.

The six-axis robot can handle payloads up to 500 g with an unmatched accuracy of 0.005 mm (5 µm).

Motion Control – ZrO2 Zirconia Ceramic Radial Ball Bearings For High Loads available from LM76 are FDA/USDA/3A-Dairy Compliant!

Motion Control – Zirconia Ceramic Radial Bearings
motion control radial bearings

E. Longmeadow, MA — Motion Control – LM76 has announced the release of their new line of Radial Ball Bearings featuring ZrO2 (Zirconia) Ceramic balls. To Complement LM76’s broad range of Linear Bearings that are FDA/UDSA/3A Dairy compliant, as well as linear bearings for extreme environments; they have added Deep Groove bearings which accommodate radial and axial loads, Angular Contact bearings for simultaneously handling radial and axial loads, Spherical Bearings which are self aligning, and Thrust Bearings for high axial loads. Each of the four types of metric bearings are available in a wide range sizes.

motion control - linear motion products

The advantages of ZrO2 ceramic balls are: FDA/USDA/3A Dairy/Caustic washdown compliant, lighter than steel balls and can be used at extreme RPMs, they withstand higher loads without spalling, have a lower coefficient of friction, are inert to chemicals, have no magnetic signature, and are non conductive.

Motion Control – The Engineering Edge – What’s the Difference?

Motion Control – Linear Bearings Compared

motion control - ceramic linear bearings
E. Longmeadow, MA – LM76’s high speed, “Black Racer,” ceramic coated linear bearings out perform linear ball bushing and linear polymer bearings in high speed and high acceleration/deceleration applications. These drop in replacement linear bearings are designed to be used in standard open and closed pillow blocks. “Black Racer” linear bearings are ideal for: Rocket sleds, crash test systems, and other high speed, high acceleration application.

Motion Control – Excellence Canada announces Electromate is a recipient of the 2021 Canadian Business Excellence Awards for Private Businesses!

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motion control - electromateTORONTO, Canada — Motion Control – TORONTO, May 21, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Electromate Inc. is pleased to announce that, at the upcoming fifth annual Canadian Business Excellence Awards for Private Businesses being held on Wednesday June 9th, Excellence Canada will be awarding Electromate with their Canadian Business Excellence Award.

“Recipients of this distinguished award have clearly demonstrated a strategic approach to successfully improving business performance and achieving goals, with a focus on the following three key performance areas: Delighted Customers; Engaged Employees; and Innovation,” says Allan Ebedes, President and CEO, Excellence Canada.

Excellence Canada’s mission is to help improve organizational performance and recognize excellence, with a vision to promote and enable excellence in every organization in Canada.

Motion Control -What To Consider When Specifying A Linear Slide

Motion Control – Tutorial

Considerations when specifying a linear slide for a new or existing application.

By Mike Quinn • LM76

When a design engineer has fully defined a linear-motion application’s requirements regarding travel length, speed, force, and accuracy as well as repeatability, the next question to answer is this:

Does an off-the-shelf linear slide (or a stock linear slide from a catalog) fully satisfy the application?

motion control - lm76

Off-the-shelf linear slides are advantageous for their quick delivery and lower cost than that of custom components. No wonder most linear-motion designs do in fact employ off-the-shelf linear slides from various component and system suppliers.

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Motion Control Tutorial – Slotted vs. Slotless Motor Technology

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Motion Control – Tutorial Motor Technology

Motion Control Tutorial – When first introduced, brushless DC motors, despite their many advantages, were cast as a costly alternative to brush-commutated motors and were typically only specified for low-power applications where long life was the primary desired requirement. Without the mechanical brush-commutator mechanism that would wear and eventually result in motor failure, brushless motors could be relied upon to deliver performance over time. As for other advantages, conventional wisdom held that brushless motors provide high speed and fast acceleration, generate less audible noise and electromagnetic interference, and require low maintenance. Brush-commutated motors, on the other hand, would afford smooth operation and greater economy. In the past decade, though, brushless motors have gained broader appeal and greater acceptance in industry for a wider range of applications previously dominated by brush-commutated products, due in part to dramatic reductions in the cost and size of electronic components and advances in motor design and manufacturing.

motion control Tutorial

At the same time, manufacturers have further sought to challenge conventional wisdom by improving brushless motor design in an effort to combine the traditional advantages of brush-commutated and brushless types. A noteworthy example of how far these innovations have progressed involves the slotless (instead of slotted) construction of the brushless motor’s stationary member, or stator.

The slotless stator design originated with the goal to deliver smooth running performance and eliminate cogging, which is an unwanted characteristic especially in slower-running applications (less than 500 rpm). The absence of cogging is, in fact, the most-often cited reason for selecting a slotless brushless motor.

Slotted Motor Construction

Most brushless motors (slotted or slotless) use electronic commutation, usually Hall-effect sensors and magnets, in place of brushes. The motor’s rotor consists of a steel shaft with permanent magnets or a magnetic ring fixed around the circumference of the shaft. The magnets are responsible for producing torque. As the flux density of the magnet material increases, the amount of torque available from the rotor assembly increases.

In traditional slotted brushless motors, the stator features a group of slotted steel laminations (0.004 in. to 0.025 in. thick), which are fused to form a solid uniform stack and create a series of teeth. Wound copper coils, which produce electromagnetic fields, are then inserted into each of the slots. Together, the laminated stack and wound copper coil form the stator assembly. The return path completing the magnetic circuit consists of the laminated material outboard of the copper windings in the stator and the motor housing.

These brushless slotted motors are especially powerful, because the teeth around which the copper wire is wound place the iron closer to the magnets, so the magnetic circuit is completed more efficiently. As the air gap between iron and magnets is reduced, the torque available for the motor is increased.

However, slotted stators are known to cause cogging, which is attributed to the teeth in their construction. Cogging occurs when the permanent magnets on the rotor seek a preferred alignment with the slots of the stator. Winding copper wires through the slots tends to increase this effect. As magnets pass by the teeth, they have a greater attraction to the iron at the ends of the teeth than to the air gaps between them. This uneven magnetic pull causes the cogging, which ultimately contributes to torque ripple, efficiency loss, motor vibration, and noise, as well as preventing smooth motor operation at slow speeds. A slotless stator offered a solution to the problems experienced with cogging in slotted brushless DC motors.

Advantage of the BLDC Slotted Motor Technology

The main advantages of the slotted technology are:

  • ease of winding customization
  • increased heat dissipation
  • ability to withstand high peak torque
  • high power density

Slotted Motor Applications

The Slotted Motor is ideal for applications such as:

  • Medical Hand Tools
  • Hand held shaver system for arthroscopic surgeries
  • High speed surgical drills for ENT surgeries

Slotless Motor Construction

Instead of winding copper wires through slots in a laminated steel stack as in conventional slotted brushless motors, slotless motor wires are wound into a cylindrical shape and are encapsulated in a hightemperature epoxy resin to maintain their orientation with respect to the stator laminations and housing assembly. This configuration, which replaces the stator teeth, eliminates cogging altogether and results in desired quiet operation and smooth performance.

The slotless design also reduces damping losses related to eddy currents. These currents are weaker in a slotless motor, because the distance between the laminated iron and magnets is greater than in a slotted motor.

Slotless motors are typically designed with sinusoidal torque output that produces negligible distortion, rather then a trapezoidal voltage output. The sinusoidal output reduces torque ripple, especially when used with a sinusoidal driver. Because the slotless design has no stator teeth to interact with the permanent magnets, the motor does not generate detent torque. In addition, low magnetic saturation allows the motor to operate at several times its rated power for short intervals without perceptible torque roll-off at higher power levels.

Compared with slotted motors, slotless construction also can significantly reduce inductance to improve current bandwidth. The teeth in a slotted motor naturally cause more inductance: the coils of copper wire around the teeth interact with the iron in a slotted motor, and this interaction tends to send the current back on itself, resulting in more damping (or dragging) and impacting negatively on slotted motor response and acceleration.

In terms of delivering power, conventional slotted motors used to enjoy the advantage over slotless types, due (as noted) to the proximity of iron and magnets and the reduced air gap.

However, this advantage has virtually evaporated, in large part due to the utilization of high-energy, rare-earch magnets (such as samarium cobalt and neodymium iron boron). By incorporating these magnets, manufacturers of slotless brushless motors have been able to routinely compensate for the greater air-gap distance. These more powerful magnets effectively enable the same (or better) torque performance for slotless products compared with slotted. Eliminating the teeth and using stronger magnets both serve to maximize the strength of the electromagnetic field for optimum power output. Rare-earth magnets, along with the fact that fewer coils, or “turns,” of the wire are required in slotless motors, also help contribute to low electrical resistance, low winding inductance, low static friction, and high thermal efficiency in slotless motor types.

One more important difference between slotless and slotted designs is the rotor diameter. Slotless motors have a larger rotor diameter than slotted construction for the same outside motor diameter and will generate a higher inertia, as well as accommodating more magnet material for greater torque. For applications with high-inertia loads, the slotless product is more likely to be specified.

Slotless Motor Applications

In general, brushless motors are usually selected over brushcommutated motors for their extended motor life. (While motor life is application-specific, 10,000 hours are usually specified.) Other reasons for specifying brushless motors include a wide speed range, higher continuous torque capability, faster acceleration, and low maintenance.

In particular, slotless versions of brushless DC motors will suit those applications that require precise positioning and smooth operation. Typical niches for these motors include computer peripherals, mass storage systems, test and measurement equipment, and medical and clean-room equipment.

As examples, designers of medical equipment can utilize slotless motors for precise control in machines that meter and pump fluids into delicate areas, such as eyes. In medical imaging equipment, slotless brushless DC motors decrease banding by providing the smoother operation at low speeds. Airplane controls supply smoother feedback to pilots. And, by eliminating cogging and resulting vibration, these motors can reduce ergonomic problems associated with hand-held production tools. Other appropriate applications include scanners, robots for library data storage, laser beam reflector rotation and radar antenna rotation equipment, among many others./span)

Customization Options

Slotless brushless DC motors, as with most motors today, feature a modular design so they can be customized to meet specific performance requirements. As examples, planetary or spur gearheads can be integrated on motors for an application’s specific torque and cost requirements. Planetary gearheads offer a higher-torque alternative. Slotless motors can further be customized with optical encoders, which provide accurate position, velocity, and direction feedback that greatly enhances motor control and allows the motors to be utilized in a wider range of applications. As a low-cost alternative to optical encoders, rotor position indicators (ie. Hall Sensors) can be specified.

When using optical encoders, differential line drivers can be utilized to eliminate the effects of electrically noisy environments. Differential line drivers are designed to ensure uncorrupted position feedback from the encoder to the control circuit.

Motor Selection Guided by Application

Despite the overall design and performance comparisons reviewed here for slotless and slotted brushless DC motor types, one should remain cautious in drawing any conclusion that one type is the ultimate choice over the other. There are simply too many variables that must be evaluated, ranging from rotor size and windings to housing and special components. A given application and its requirements should (and will) be the guiding factors in selecting a particular motor type and the customized components to be incorporated.

Some encouraging news in those applications that would clearly benefit from a slotless brushless motor is that costs are coming down to be more in line with those for slotted motors. This is because of new streamlined manufacturing techniques and an increasingly available supply of powerful magnets, which are both beginning to have a positive impact on end-product costs.

Regardless of any cost differential, however, for many applications, slotless brushless DC motors will be the preferred choice to resolve specific requirement issues. While advances in electronics are beginning to be applied that promise to reduce normal cogging in slotted products as a step toward making these motors more smooth running and quiet, the industry is not there yet: slotless motors remain the best alternative where cogging and life are defining performance issues

This Tutorial and other Motion Control Tutorials are available through www.Servo2Go.com

For further information on this new product or others in our extensive product portfolio, call 1- 877-378-0240 or e-mail Warren Osak at warren@servo2go.comor visit Servo2Go.com at: www.Servo2Go.com

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Motion Control Components Application Exoskeleton! – Maxon Driven – Focus – 2020 Cybathlon!

Motion Control – Application Exoskeleton

“People with disabilities are only disabled if they come up against the insurmountable. But where do the obstacles in our everyday lives come from? From barriers in our minds” … Cybathlon founder Robert Riener.

motion control - maxon motors

 


motion control - maxon motor

 

Taunton, MA — Motion Control Components Application – maxon’s DRIVEN magazine just released a special issue focusing on the 2020 CYBATHLON to be held in Zurich on September 19th and 20th.This is an event where people with physical disabilities compete against each other in obstacle courses with the use of assistance systems such as exoskeletons, bionics prostheses and motorized wheelchairs. 

Motion Control – Automation Fair in Vancouver, BC on November 6, 2019

Motion Control Automation – WorkShop/Seminar
motion control automation fair

 

 

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We are excited to invite you to the Electromate Automation Fair on November 6, 2019. The event will take place at the Delta Hotels Burnaby Conference Centre in Burnaby, British Columbia. The Automation Fair is a great opportunity to explore new technologies and see what’s changing in the world of Automation and Motion Control. Don’t miss this opportunity to meet some of leading manufacturers in the Automation Industry, as well as like-minded industry professionals.

Manufacturers in Attendance Include:

Advanced Motion Controls

Applied Motion Products

Exor Electronic

Galil Motion Control

Gam Gear

Kollmorgen

Macron Dynamics

Maxon Motor

Posital Fraba

Harmonic Drive

Tolomatic

Who would benefit from this Seminar:

OEM’s, Custom Machine Builders and End Users in the following industries: Medical, Pharmaceutical, Life Science, Subsea, Robotics, Industrial Automation, Food & Beverage, Forestry, Packaging, Film & Entertainment, Scientific, and Communication Industries.

Topics Covered Include:

Industrial Automation

Motion Control

Robotics

Machine Control

Motor Control

The Agenda Includes:

Lunch will be served as well as snacks/drinks throughout the day. A host bar (beer & wine only) will be open from 1:00pm to 7:00pm.

Cost to attend the Automation Fair is FREE, however preregistration is required. Click HERE to register.

About Electromate:

Electromate’s Core Purpose is to help Manufacturers build better machines using differentiated automation technology. They specialize in Robotic and Mechatronic Solutions for the Industrial Automation marketplace. Respected by customers as a premiere source for High Performance Automation and Motion Control Components & Systems, Electromate® specializes in AC & DC Servo and Stepper Motors & Drives, Motion & Automation Controllers, Positioning Systems & Actuators, Feedback Devices, Gearing Products and HMI’s & Operator Displays, all supported via extensive product selection, just-in-timedelivery, dedicated customer service and technical engineering support.

More on Electromate can be found at

Website: http://www.electromate.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/209277/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Electromate

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/electromateindustrial/

Blog: https://electromate.wordpress.com/

Electromate Best Blace to Work

For more information on the “Best Place to Work”CLICK HERE!

To view Electromate’s new corporate video CLICK HERE

For further information on this new product or others in our extensive product portfolio, call 1-877-SERVO99 (737-8699) or e-mail Warren Osak at sales@electromate.com or visit Electromate at: www.electromate.com


For other Motion Control Components, Applications, and Technology from Electromate go to: http://MotionControlBuyersguide.com
 

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Motion Control – The Engineering Edge – Jet Rail Linear Roller Blocks – Loading Instructions

Go to http://lm76blogger.com/linear_motion/1407 for an Application of Jet Rail Linear Roll Blocks

About LM76 and “The Engineering Edge”

Founded in 1976, LM76 has been a leading designer/manufacturer of linear bearings, slides and linear motion systems. LM76 is renowned for its industry leading Minuteman PTFE Composite linear bearings. LM76 is a leading supplier of precision linear shafting: RC60, 300 Series Stainless Steel, and ceramic-coated aluminum shafting. LM76 also offers several FDA/USDA compliant linear bearings and slides for the food processing, pharmaceutical, medical, and packaging industries.

When others think catalog …   … LM76 thinks solution!

For additional information contact Mike Quinn at: LM76, 140 Industrial Dr., E. Longmeadow, MA 01028; Telephone: 413-525-4166, Fax: 413-525-3735 or E-Mail: mquinn@lm76.com or visit the website at http://www.lm76.com

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The Engineering Edge – Application – Trunnion Grinding Slide for Oil Field

 

We are shipping another slide today for the oil patch. When Weir Oil and Gas called with a slide application that required special engineering, LM76 was all ears – as it was right up our alley. This slide is a Trunnion Grinding Slide which has a 56HP motor running at 3500 RPM mounted to the Y Axis – with a 12″ grinding wheel attached. The X Axis (52″ Stroke) runs on 440C stainless linear ball bearings that have special beryllium copper scraper seal cartridges while the Y Axis (4″ Stroke) employs profile rail guides with double scraper seal kits. Our customer did not want protective bellows so we had to ensure grinding debris would not cause bearing or screw/nut failures. On both axis, we employed our proprietary “Polymatrix, Double Preloaded Nuts” as opposed to recirculating ball nuts. Why LM76? Good question…we were the only company that got back to them with a thoughtful solution.

About LM76 and “The Engineering Edge”

Founded in 1976, LM76 has been a leading designer/manufacturer of linear bearings, slides and linear motion systems. LM76 is renowned for its industry leading Minuteman PTFE Composite linear bearings. LM76 is a leading supplier of precision linear shafting: RC60, 300 Series Stainless Steel, and ceramic-coated aluminum shafting. LM76 also offers several FDA/USDA compliant linear bearings and slides for the food processing, pharmaceutical, medical, and packaging industries.

When others think catalog …   … LM76 thinks solution!

For additional information contact Mike Quinn at: LM76, 140 Industrial Dr., E. Longmeadow, MA 01028; Telephone: 413-525-4166, Fax: 413-525-3735 or E-Mail: mquinn@lm76.com or visit the website at http://www.lm76.com

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Motion Control Application – Intelligent robot systems are increasingly being used in disaster control, rescue missions and salvage operations!

After the severe earthquake in Japan and the subsequent nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Quince managed to reach the upper floors of the ruins of the power plant. There it measured the radioactivity levels and sent HD images to the world outside.

Wherever it is too dangerous for humans. Robots that can look for survivors after an explosion, an earthquake or other natural disasters, providing humans with a view of inaccessible areas. Powerful EC motors from maxon motor give the Japanese rescue robot “Quince” its drive.motion control application robot Quince

 

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Fall River, MA — Motion Control Components Application – Robots that are used in disaster areas have to have a very high level of adaptability. They have to be fairly small, not too heavy and maneuverable enough to get through cracks or narrow spaces to reach areas deep inside a building. Furthermore rough terrain should present no problem. These rescue robots enter and explore buildings to determine if there are gases, radiation or other life-threatening hazards, before human rescue teams can search the area. Quince has proven that it fulfills all these demands. After the severe earthquake in Japan and the subsequent nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Quince managed to reach the upper floors of the ruins of the power plant in June 2011. There it measured the radioactivity levels and sent HD images to the world outside (To see video – CLICK HERE). The robot was able to supply valuable information from areas where no human can set foot.motion control robot goes down stairs

Quince weighs 27 kg and is equipped with four moving caterpillar drives (flippers). These flippers automatically adapt their angular position to the surface underneath – regardless of whether the robot is climbing steep stairs or crossing rough terrain. Correct ground contact is a very important prerequisite. This contact is accurately analyzed by measuring the power consumption of the flipper motors. Furthermore PSD (Position-Sensitive Device) sensors on the front and rear flippers measure the distance to the ground. In addition to a gripper arm (see fig. 2), two laser scanners can also be attached to the robot. These scanners are capable of accurately capturing the structure of the terrain.motion control robot navigates rough terrain

Additionally Quince is equipped with a “bird’s eye camera” and can travel quite fast, at 1.6 meters per second. The operator that controls the robot has to tell it which direction to take, but the robot itself determines the optimal flipper positions for crossing various surfaces, for example stairs. Newer Quince motors have additionally been equipped with a device for collecting radio-active dust or ultra-fine particles, as well as a 3D scanner. To ensure that no robot is lost, a connection to a wireless network is possible, which is the only way to navigate the robot if the connection cable breaks.

The rescue robot was developed by Eiji Koyanagi, Vice-Director of the Chiba Institute of Technology Future Robotics Technology Center (fuRO). Koyanagi started his career as a teacher – at the age of 51, he became a professor. This means that he has a completely different background than other researchers in the field of robotics. Quince has been specially designed for extreme conditions in environments where it would be too dangerous for humans. Therefore its main area of application is disaster areas. “When you develop a robot, you first have to consider the tasks that it will perform later. That is the biggest challenge,” explains Koyanagi. Hitherto eight Quince robots have been built. But before this could be done, all components had to be 100% functional. To this end, various trials were run in the large “Disaster City” training area in College Station, Texas. Quince was the only robot that successfully completed the entire obstacle course at the site as part of a RoboCup contest. In preparation for using the robot inside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, several specific customizations were required. “The conditions in the nuclear reactor buildings are very tough. If we had attempted to send Quince in without modifications, it would probably have met its end,” says Koyanagi. Therefore the robot had to be able to survive a fall from approx. 2 m high unscathed, and had to be largely maintenance-free.

Powerful motors to beat every obstacle

Motion Control -Maxon Motors used in robot Quince

Where the motor selection was concerned, fuRO required absolutely reliable drives. The motors have to provide high power and high efficiency, yet be small and light. These requirements were precisely met by maxon motors, explains Koyanagi. Six powerful maxon motors drive the robot. The brushless EC-4pole 30 direct current motors each provide 200 W; two of these have been installed in the two main chains. The powerful 4-pole units give their all when Quince maneuvers its way across uneven terrain. Four additional motors (EC22) drive the moving chain drives (flippers). These can automatically adapt their angular position to the surface below. The 3D scanner unit of Quince is moved to the right position by an RE-max 24. Thanks to the special winding technology and the 4-pole magnets, the maxon EC-4pole drives are unbeatable when it comes to delivering the highest driving power per unit of volume and weight. The motors have no cogging torque, high efficiency, and excellent control dynamics. The metal housing additionally ensures good heat dissipation and mechanical stability. All motors of the chain drives have been combined with the GP32HP (High Power) planetary gearhead with MR encoder. This gearhead was customized by installing a large ball bearing and a reinforced motor shaft. With this power pack, Quince has no trouble managing almost any obstacle.

Contact maxon for more details info@maxonmotorusa.com

Comprehensive documentation and software are included with every delivery, and are also available for you to download from our website at www.maxonmotor.com.

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Motion Control – Robotic Symposiums – How to Build Robots

Electromate is pleased to announce it will be hosting two Robotic Symposiums’ 

 Tuesday March 20th in Toronto and on Wednesday March 21st in Montreal.

 

Participating in the Symposiums will be Speakers from:

Galil Motion Control                      www.galilmc.com/
Harmonic Drive LLC                        www.harmonicdrive.net/
Maxon Motor AG                           www.maxonmotor.com

Advanced Motion Controls           www.a-m-c.com

Kollmorgen                                      www.kollmorgen.com

École de technologie supérieure  www.etsmtl.ca

Topics:


Technical Presentations related to the design of Robotic Systems including:  Collaborative/Assistive Robots, SCARA Robots, Cartesian Robots and Delta Robots.  Presentations will focus on the electromechanical, mechanical, electrical and control component design, sizing and selection.

 

Who would benefit from this Seminar:

Designer & Project Engineers and Graduate School Engineering Students in the Medical, Biotech, Pharmaceutical, Lab & General Automation markets who are looking to gain a practical understanding of the core motion control technology used in robotic applications.

 

The Symposium agenda includes:

9:00-9:15am                    Electromate Welcome Remarks & Introduction
9:15-10:00am                  ETS/Dr. Ilian Bonev
10:00-10:45am                Maxon Presentation
10:45-11:00am                Break + Tabletop Displays
11:00-11:45am                Galil Presentation
11:45-1:00pm                  Lunch + Tabletop Displays
1:00-1:45pm                    Harmonic Drive Presentation
1:45-2:30pm                    Kollmorgen Presentation
2:30-3:00pm                    Break + Tabletop Displays
3:00-3:45pm                    Advanced Motion Controls Presentation
3:45-4:30pm                    Electromate Closing Remarks

Breakfast & Lunch will be served.

The Seminar is FREE, however seating is limited. Click on the REGISTRATION LINK

to register today!

About Electromate:

Electromate’s Core Purpose is to help Manufacturers build better machines using differentiated automation technology. They specialize in Robotic and Mechatronic Solutions for the Industrial Automation marketplace. Respected by customers as a premiere source for High Performance Automation and Motion Control Components & Systems, Electromate® specializes in AC & DC Servo and Stepper Motors & Drives, Motion & Automation Controllers, Positioning Systems & Actuators, Feedback Devices, Gearing Products and HMI’s & Operator Displays, all supported via extensive product selection, just-in-timedelivery, dedicated customer service and technical engineering support.

More on Electromate can be found at

Website: http://www.electromate.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/209277/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Electromate

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/electromateindustrial/

Google+: https://plus.google.com/104057418684128701566

Blog: https://electromate.wordpress.com/

To view Electromate’s new corporate video CLICK HERE

For further information on this new product or others in our extensive product portfolio, call 1-877-SERVO99 (737-8699) or e-mail Warren Osak at sales@electromate.com or visit Electromate at: www.electromate.com

 

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Motion Control Application- Maxon Drives Help People Walk Again!

At the first Cybathlon in Zürich, researchers are presenting the world’s best exoskeletons – devices that enable paraplegics to walk again. Motors from Switzerland play a central part in this development.

Maxon motion control application - Helping People Walk Again

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Fall River, MA — Motion Control Components Application – On October 8th 2016, people with paraplegia are going on a footrace at the Cybathlon in Zürich. Aided by exoskeletons, they will compete against each other on an obstacle course to show the public how far advanced technology has come in this area.

Switzerland, is playing a central role in this process. Many of the exoskeletons are fitted with components from the canton of Obwalden – components without which there wouldn’t be a lot of movement to be observed.

From the planet Mars to an exoskeleton

Robotic suits have to be both powerful and lightweight. Too much weight would cause the battery to drain in no time. This presents a big challenge to developers. Most of the motors that are strong enough to power an exoskeleton are large and heavy. This is why engineers are turning to the Swiss company that already developed the drives for NASA’s Mars rovers: maxon motor. maxon drives are powerful, lightweight, and energy-efficient, meaning that they can conserve battery power, and be very durable.

“We spent decades perfecting our motors”, says maxon CEO Eugen Elmiger. A lot of money has gone into research and development. It was worth it: These days, the motors from Switzerland can be found everywhere, in robots, airplanes, cars, and medical devices.

Knowledge yields an advantage in the market

Providing competent technical support for customers is just as important as delivering high-quality products. Small businesses and start-ups often approach maxon with specific drive technology problems that they lack the expert knowledge to solve by themselves. maxon motor, in turn is able to help with its extensive experience in the field, a strength that lets the company stand out from the international competition. “Our knowledge and the ability to give expert advice are a great advantage in the market,” says Elmiger. The Cybathlon is a good example: In the field of exoskeletons, the Swiss company has a pretty clear idea about what’s important besides choosing the right motor. As a result, quite a few of the participating teams are using products from Switzerland. The same is true for other disciplines, such as prosthetic arms or legs and electrical wheelchairs.

For examples, read maxon’s exclusive Cybathlon brochure or visit the new site for technology enthusiasts – drive.tech

maxon supports the Cybathlon as a sponsor and partner

The Cybathlon games are organized by the ETH Zürich and are being held for the first time on October 8, 2016 at the Swiss Arena in Zürich. Around 80 teams from all over the world will be participating. The machine-assisted competitors will compete against one another in six disciplines: prosthetic legs, prosthetic arms, exoskeletons, motorized wheelchairs, bicycles with muscle stimulation, and virtual racing using thought control. What’s not allowed at the Paralympics is an absolute must at the Cybathlon: the use of state-of-the-art technology. “Our aim with the Cybathlon is to break down barriers between the general public, people with disabilities, and scientists,” says ETH professor Robert Riener, who invented the Cybathlon.

The Swiss drive specialist maxon motor supports the Cybathlon as a sponsor and partner. The company will be present at the games with a workshop for the teams and a small exhibition about the history of prosthetics.

Comprehensive documentation and software are included with every delivery, and are also available for you to download from our website at www.maxonmotor.com.

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Motion Control – Electric drives … … invisible helpers in our everyday lives!

Motion Control – driven magazine reveals where they are commonly used.

Precision drive systems can be found in the home, in vehicles, and at work, making our lives simpler and safer. The current issue of driven, the maxon motor magazine, provides interesting insights into the world of drive technology. It also goes in search of an old friend.

motion control Online Magazine Driven

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Fall River, MA — Motion Control Components- Online Magazine – Most people have nothing to do with drive systems in their work. However, without being aware of it, they come across them everywhere: in cars, buses, elevators, and even within their own four walls. Drive systems are invisible to ordinary people, but they play an important role in our lives. driven, the maxon motor magazine, spends a day with a family and discovers some exciting uses for them.

What’s Roboy doing these days?

driven readers can find out what the popular robot known as Roboy has been doing over the last few years and what the future holds for him. We also take a look at the hot topic of women in technical careers. Two female engineers from maxon describe their experiences in a male-dominated world and give young women some useful tips.

driven focuses on drive technology and is published twice per year in three languages. The print version is available free of charge at magazine.maxonmotor.com.

All issues are also available on the driven app, which can be downloaded from the App Store and Google Play Store.

Maxon Motion Control Apple App

 

 

 

Maxon Motion Control Android App

 

 

 

Comprehensive documentation and software are included with every delivery, and are also available for you to download from our website at www.maxonmotor.com.

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Order Our Catalog

Linear Bearing Engineers Design Camera Sliders for the Pro and Beginner!

Designed by Linear Bearing Engineers Camera Sliders for the Beginner and the PRO

PRODUCTS | CONTACT US | NEWS | VIDEOS | Designer Spotlight | Artist Spotlight | NEW SLIDER

The difference between rolling and sliding friction in camera sliders. Mike Quinn

Take a quarter and roll it on its edge across a table – goes forever and moves quickly. Now take that quarter and lay it on its side and push it…that’s the difference. Sleeve bushings inherently have much more surface area under load. Simply put, they have big feet. Conversely, a ball and roller have much smaller feet ensuring them a meaningfully lower co-efficient of friction. A ball offers point contact loading and loosely reside in 4 rows within a steel or plastic shell:

ball

These balls literally kick each other along as the balls roll down the shaft. Because they have so little contact area, the coefficient of friction is as low as .001 – they roll easily and smoothly. The drawbacks in a camera slider are readily recognizable:

1. Resonance – noise – ZING! ZING! ( Metal on metal contact and because they push each other from load to preloads, they create resonance, noise and vibration.
2. They are made from steel and can rust – they require lubrication.

Rollers have internal ball or needle bearings at their core, between the inner and outer race. They are separated in a retainer, unlike linear ball bushings which run loose in their track ways.

roller roller

These are sealed and lubricated for life. They have more contact area but the coefficient of friction remains low approximately .003 – not as low as the ball – but very close. These rollers come in dual angular contact ( gothic arch ) or V geometries. They are very smooth, take high loads/moment loads ( overhanging loads )and provide great stiffness. They are however steel and they run on steel shafting or V groove rails. They can produce noise and are vulnerable to the elements.

Plastic Sleeve Bearings are truly all weather and can run very smoothly and tolerate debris. However, the real world coefficient of friction is around .2 – factors higher than ball and rollers. They are also prone to a phenomena called edge loading. This effect can cause the carriage plate ( slider ) to ratchet or get sticky due the bearings digging into the shaft. This is particularly troublesome when you attempt to slide the carriage plate with top heavy rigs like a DSLR with a Red Rock system. You will need two hands.

There is an answer…Camera Motions new ” Silent Slider “

Why? Because we offer a solid, 1 piece precision machined aluminum carriage block that is black anodized. Not an extrusion that is cheap and has varying tolerances one lot to another. We have selected the best industry urethane cam followers with needle bearing rollers – tight and true. Moreover, the rollers damp any noise or vibration yet hold a 25 pound load. Smooth, quiet and solid. The Silent Slider is a product of linear motion engineering – pure and simple. It was was designed to run on a 16mm twin extruded rail which is ubiquitous in the the camera slider industry. Keep your rail and tripod shoe and move to the future – The” Silent Slider!”

Let engineering win – not salesmen. Only $ 230.00. Call Mike Quinn @ 1-800-698-5820.

Motion Control Seminar – DC Motor Sizing Made Easy!

Motion Control – February 19 &20 – DC Motor Sizing Made Easy! A Practical Seminar presented by Jan Braun, maxon motor ag, Switzerland

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Motion Control - Electromate Maxon Course

 

[Textbook shown (a $65 US value) is included with your Seminar attendance]

Location/Date:

Hilton Garden Inn – Dorval Aeroport

St. Laurent, PQ

Tuesday February 19, 2013

 

Location/Date:

Radisson Plaza Mississagua – Toronto Airport

Mississagua, ON

Wednesday February 20, 2013

 

Time:

9:00 am –2:00 pm Lunch included

Price:

$89 CDN/person + HST* (*Ontario Only; Quebec registrants will be charged 5% GST only) if pre-registered by midnight January 3ist; after February 1st the cost is $109 CDN/person + applicable taxes.

 

To Register:

Visit http://www.electromate.com/news/?c=calendar or call us at 877-737-8698 with your credit card information

This half-day seminar provides the practical information you need to successfully select the right DC motor –- be it brushed or brushless –- for your application. You’ll learn about the interpretation of motor data and how you can use this information for motor sizing. Whether you need high speed and dynamics or just high torque, this seminar will teach you to size a drive with just the right power reserves avoiding costly oversized motors.

What You’ll Receive:

– Textbook: “The selection of high-precision microdrives” (a $65 US value) — A complete, easy-to-read reference guide for motor and drive selection OR you’ll receive an $89 Can. voucher to be used towards your next Maxon order (voucher expires Dec. 31, 2013)

– Maxon Formulae Handbook

– E-Learning software tutorial on USB Stick

– maxon catalog

What You’ll Learn:

– Basics of DC motor data. Learn how to interpret motor data sheets and use the speed/torque information for optimum motor sizing

– Systematic drive selection in the context of your application specific requirements and boundary conditions. This includes optimum power management, control loops, accuracy and ambient conditions

– Basics of gearhead data and their impact on motor selection

– Selection criteria for DC motors. Topics include the characteristics of different commutation types for brushed and brushless DC motors and when to use them

– Maxon selection program. Find out how this software-tool can help you select a servo motor

– Application examples. Learn how to extract the key parameters for drive selection from your application: The examples include continuous operation as well as dynamic operation cycles

– Motion Control: The main features and application possibilities of maxon EPOS controllers

 

Agenda

09:00 – 09:45 Motor selection: What is it all about?

– The context of motor selection

– Application and situation analysis

– Extracting key load parameters

09:45 – 10:10 Properties of brushed and brushless DC motors:

– Design variants

– Brush systems

– Electronic commutation systems

10:10 – 10:20 Coffee break

10:20 – 10:50 Motor data sheets:

– Characteristic motor lines

– Operation ranges

10:50 – 11:30 Motor selection examples:

– Continuous operation

11:30 – 11:40 Coffee break

11:40 – 12:30 Motor selection examples:

– Cyclic operation

– Maxon selection program demonstration

12:30 – 13:00 Lunch break

13:00 – 14:00 EPOS and ESCON Systems:

– System architecture

– Introduction EPOS family

– Introduction ESCON family

– Demonstrations, Examples

For further information on this new product or others in our extensive product portfolio, call 1- 877-378-0240 or e-mail Warren Osak at warren@servo2go.com or visit Servo2Go.com at: www.Servo2Go.com
 
 
 

 
 

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